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What Is XML?

What Is XML?
You might already know for a fact that there are different sets of computer languages. However, if you are looking for a language that is in a simple form and is popular for its usability and simplicity over the net, you might be searching for XML. XML stands for Extensible Markup Language. It has already gained popularity due to the ease in its use and easy to understand concepts.

Nowadays, a lot of programmers make use of XML as it is very easy to deal with. It is very common for Microsoft Office programming, Apple, cellular phone development, and many other applications. It has also evolved and has continued to add more complex languages throughout the years.

However, if you have decided to make use of XML, there are a few rules that you have to remember. First in the list is the matching of the tags that you use. Whatever it is that you use in the opening must be the same that you use for closing. You must also be familiar of the different key terminologies so as it would be a lot easier for you to immediately arrive at the results that you would want to see.

It is also important that you take a closer look at the syntax being used as well as the character spacing involved. This is where programmers often commit mistakes. Thus, if this is the problem, you have to really take a closer look at the details that you have used.

Since XML was first used, it has now evolved into different versions. Thus, as you see it now, we have the XML version 1.0. We also have the version 1.1, 1.2 and so on. Each of these versions contains more complicated terms, syntax, and wider applications. Just check each of the lower versions first to get the hang of the more complex ones.

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Posted by Jodel X on Jul 12th, 2011 and filed under Protocols & Formats. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response via following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site