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What is Yayo?

What is Yayo?
Yayo is an urban lingo or slang for cocaine. It originated from the Spanish word “llello” which is pronounced “yeyo” in the US. This is why some people sort of misspell the word and use “yeyo” instead of “yayo”. “Llello” or “yayo” is said to be popularized by an Al Pacino movie called “Scarface”.

Yayo, llello, coke, or cocaine is an illegal drug in most, if not all, countries of the world. It can be sourced from the “coca” plant, hence the term “cocaine”. As a drug, its main effects are to stimulate the central nervous system, suppress the appetite, and to provide topical anesthesia. Because of its effect on the central nervous system in terms of giving a mental and emotional boost, yayo or cocaine is very addictive.

What makes yayo very addictive is that it gives a “good” feeling to the one taking the drug. Besides from being more alert and having more energy, those who have taken the drug will usually feel euphoric and have a general sense of well-being. This is what makes people take this drug and get addicted to it. Some also feel very good about themselves in terms of their performance at work, at sports, and even sexual activities. These are basically the effects that drug addicts are looking for when taking the drug. Most of them only think of what the immediate benefits are without thinking of possible harm to their bodies.

Aside from the supposed “good” effects of yayo or cocaine, this drug can also cause behavioral changes like paranoia, anxiety, and restlessness. Some also experience serious medical concerns if the drug is taken in high doses. These negative effects may include tremors, hyperthermia, and convulsions.

For health reasons, one must make sure not to even try taking this drug for any reason whatsoever. Yayo or cocaine’s negative effect on the brain and the entire body should be enough to deter any person from taking this dangerous drug.

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Posted by Erwin Z on May 3rd, 2011 and filed under Humanities, Language. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response via following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site