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What is Third Person?

What is Third Person?
Third person is considered the most commonly used point of view in the fiction style of writing. It is also a traditional form used in academic writing. The term refers to the grammatical person which composes of the pronouns he, she and they. There are authors and novelists who use the term he and she when referring to a person. The term “it” on the other hand is used to refer to a place, thing or idea and some composers use it to mean a specific person.

Third person in the grammatical usage also have singular and plural forms. He, she and it are pronouns in the third person which are singular subjective cases. However, there are also other specifications in the use of this phrase. For instance, it has the objective case which instead of he, you use him, her for the word she and it as the neuter category. For the possessive case, the third person used for he is his, her or hers for she and “its” for the neuter category.

For the last chart and must-know about this term in the grammatical category, you also have the third-person plural. He, she and it are all in singular form while in the plural form, the word “they” is the only term used. However, this word also has its subjective, objective and possessive case. “They” is the subjective plural form while the objective plural form is “them”. Lastly, the possessive case in plural form for the third-person word “they” is “their” or “theirs”.

Third person is a basic grammar component used in verbal and written media. It is a common term used especially in narratives and books which delivers a more authoritative and objective view compared to first or second person style of writing. This gives a more distant and firm approach since the writer is not involved in the topic.

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Posted by Jodel X on May 15th, 2011 and filed under Language. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response via following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site