Home » Protocols & Formats » What is SQL?

What is SQL?

What is SQL?
The term SQL has now become more popular in database computer language. The term SQL actually refers to Structured Query Language. It is designed in order to manage data assigned in Regional Database Management Systems or RDBMS. This is a unique computer language since it does not necessarily adhere to the relational model by Codd. Yet, despite that fact, it still grew out to be the most widely used database language. Now, what are even more interesting about this SQL are the terms that could be used in order to achieve a particular result. This article will discuss a few of these terms.

The “WHERE” clause indicates a comparison predicate. It restricts the rows as returned by the query. Another is the FROM clause. It says the tables from which the data is to be retrieved. One more is the ORDER BY clause. This one identifies the columns to be used in sorting the data results. This includes the direction to which they will be sorted, either in ascending or descending order. Without the said clause, the result will be undefined for the order of rows returned by an SQL.

Now, despite the fact that this language is commonly used and is now the trend in computer database language, there are still those who can say something against its use. Primarily, it is considered inconsistent in regards to its implementation as compared with that of the standard. Its non- compliance to the Codd rule is also one more thing that has caused troubles, complexities, and other problems. To top it all, the use of the language can be a bit complicated as it is not going with the norms and is totally distinct.

Well, whether we like this or not, we could not deny the fact that the use of SQL has already become popular and in demand these days.

If you like this article or our site. Please spread the word. Share it with your friends/family.
Email This Post Email This Post Print This Post Print This Post

Leave a Reply

About This Post
Posted by Jodel X on Jul 12th, 2011 and filed under Protocols & Formats. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response via following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site