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What is Oregon known for?

What is Oregon known for?
Oregon is known for a lot of things but one of its best assets is the Crater Lake, which is considered the deepest lake in the US and very famous for its water clarity and deep blue color. Crater Lake is part of the Crater Lake National Park and is said to be formed more than 7000 years ago. This lake was considered the remains of Mt. Mazama and is famous not only in the US but also in other parts of the world.

Crater Lake was not the original name of this famous lake in Oregon. In the past it was called Blue Lake because of the deep blue color of the water. Later it was renamed to Lake Majesty, probably referring to the majestic appearance of this volcanic remain. And then finally, it was renamed again to what we now know as Crater Lake.

Crater Lake is part of Klamath County in Oregon, which is about 130km from Medford City. It has an average depth of 350 meters with a maximum depth recorded at 594 meters, making it the deepest lake in all of the US and the 7th deepest lake all across the globe. The lake also measures 8 by 10 kilometers across making it a quite a big volcanic lake also. The lake’s waters are also considered one of the clearest and purest since the lake has no inlets or tributaries. Based on Secchi disk clarity measurements, Crater Lake registers a consistent clarity range of 20 to 30 meters, which is considered “very clear” for natural bodies of water.

To show high regard for the lake, the people of Oregon features it in one of their license plate designs for automobiles. The Oregon State Quarter, a commemorative coin, also featured Crater Lake on the reverse side. This particular coin was minted back in 2005.

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Posted by Erwin Z on May 19th, 2011 and filed under Miscellaneous. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response via following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site