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What is Nirvana?


Nirvana refers to a major idea in Buddhist faith as well as the ultimate goal for all for all Buddhists. However, most Buddhists claim that it is impossible to describe this concept without really experiencing it. It is claimed that persons who have achieved nirvana have transcended beyond concerns of this world. Some religious people and philosophers have looked into the Buddhist nirvana concept and what it all about. There are lively discussions around this concept among the Buddhist community. It is said that when a person attains nirvana, it implies that the person has become free of a suffering and reincarnation cycle called samsara, which portrays life in this world. Besides gaining freedom from worldly suffering, a person who attains nirvana also goes beyond the concerns and obsessions of this world. Such a person is said to have high levels of compassion and wisdom and has gotten to a form where he has perfect peace with all things. According to the Buddhists, nirvana represents the highest form a human being can reach and it actually takes very long to achieve this form.

Distinguishing nirvana in life and nirvana after death

Buddhists differentiate between a nirvana state that is attained during life from the nirvana form that is attained after death. It is said that persons like Buddha attained nirvana through strong faith, prayer and asceticism during his lifetime and was rewarded with a final nirvana. A final nirvana is said to occur after death. When a person achieves nirvana during their life on earth, the person is expected to be identified easily because their spiritual state causes them to stand out. Buddhists endeavor to reach nirvana through the Eightfold Path as well as other precepts embedded in their faith. Many of them hold that there is no means of getting to know how long they have stayed in this world striving towards the final nirvana.

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Posted by on Oct 23rd, 2014 and filed under Humanities, Religion. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.