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What is Mava?

What is Mava?
Mava is most famous in India and is a key ingredient in making different kinds of delicacies or sweet dishes. Mava is basically milk, which has been processed and reduced to a semi-solid consistency.

Mava is known by a number of other names. Among these are Khoya, Mawa, and Kiti. Do not be confused if you encounter these names in Indian recipes in place of Mava.

Normally, Mava is very thick and almost solid milk. It can be found in Indian markets or commercially prepared. However, some Indians prefer to prepare Mava at home. The traditional preparation of Mava is time-consuming. However, there is a faster method now that Indians can follow with the help of a microwave. The commercial preparation is simply a method of boiling and processing milk to reduce it into an almost solid state.

Over time, different kinds of Mava or Khoya have been produced. These types of Mava are classified according to their consistencies or use of moisture as well as the used in preparing the Mava.

Hard Mava or Batti Ka Khoya is the hardest or toughest Mava available in the market. It commonly comes in a molded form. Batti Ka Khoya is prepared using full fat milk. This type of Mava is used when making burfies or laddoos.

The second type of Mava is known as Smooth Mava or Chikna Khoya. This type has high moisture content thus sticky and loose. Chikna Khoya is preferred when preparing rabri, gulab jamuns, and halwas.
Another type of Mava is called Granulated Khoya Mava or Danedar Khoya. The consistency of this Mava is somewhere between the Smooth and Hard Mava. It is granulated because the milk slightly curdled before evaporation.

Mava is a common kitchen fixture among Indian households. However, this ingredient can be rarely found elsewhere.

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Posted by Jodel X on May 13th, 2011 and filed under Food. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response via following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site