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What is Maundy Thursday?

Maundy Thursday

Maundy Thursday is the other name used to refer to Holy Thursday. These are the initial three days where the events that preceded the Jesus’ crucifixion are remembered solemnly. The term Maundy is derived from Latin language word, ‘mandatum’ which implies commandment. During Easter holidays, Maundy Thursday is the Thursday that comes just before the Good Friday. Though it is often overlooked by many Christians and churches, it represents a very crucial truth in the Christian faith. It is reflects Jesus, a suffering servant who calls disciples to serve others. As written in the book of John in the Bible, Jesus did wash his disciple’s feet on the night before he was betrayed and arrested. This explains why most services held on similar nights typically involve washing of people’s feet or why any other physical actions that reflect care are a core element of the service.

Linkage between Passover and Crucifixion

Maundy Thursday also shows the linkage between the Passover and the sacrificial role that Jesus took up on the cross. On the night prior to being crucified, Jesus has a Passover dinner with his twelve disciples. Passover refers to a Jewish holiday set aside to commemorate the deliverance of Israelites by God from Egypt where they had been enslaved for more than 400 years. Jesus was aware that the supper presented him with the last opportunity to advise his followers prior to his crucifixion so he discussed his purposes in length including how his disciples should respond and the coming of the Holy Spirit. After that, he demonstrated incredible levels of servant hood and humility by washing the feet of his disciples. He then gave them bread and wine asking them to take those in commemoration of him. This act of taking bread and wine is commonly known as Communion today.

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Posted by on Nov 8th, 2014 and filed under Culture, Humanities, Religion. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.