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What is LGA?

What is LGA?
LGA stands for Land Grid Array and it is used in computer motherboards to serve as the physical interface for microprocessors. It is a type of packaging for integrated circuits in which the pins are placed on sockets, unlike other forms where the pins are connected directly to the ICs. Older forms like PGAs or pin grid arrays involve pins on the microprocessor chips. But in land grid arrays, the setup involves copper pads that come in contact with the pins on the computer’s motherboard.

The use of LGA sockets were first done back in 1996 but it was only in 2004 when the LGA platform was widely used starting with Pentium 4 – Prescott processors. But aside from Intel chips and microprocessors, the LGA platform is also used by its competitor AMD. LGAs have become more popular especially for those setups that require a higher pin density and in which case, the use of PGAs would mean a larger hardware setup for computer motherboards.

LGA 775 is Intel’s most common socket and this is also referred to as Socket T. The number “775″ refers to the number of pins that protrude and come in contact with the computer’s CPU or processor. This LGA socket is said to provide a more efficient distribution of power to computer’s processor when compared to other LGA sockets. And since the LGA setup involves the pins are now on the computer’s motherboard rather than on the processor, the risk of bending and/or damaging the pins is also now on the motherboard. This makes LGA 775 or Socket T a very popular choice when it comes to computer processor setup. It also works for most computers and motherboards which is why many companies use this type of socket for their own setup. Intel’s Socket J or LGA 771 is the type typically used for servers. Both variants though provide more power contact because of the high density of pins. This results to increased power efficiency and stability to the computer chip. As for AMD, they have LGA 1974 or Socket G34 and LGA 1207 or Socket F for their servers.

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Posted by Erwin Z on Jul 16th, 2011 and filed under Hardware. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response via following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site