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What is Kismet?


Kismet is a term derived from the word ‘gismah’, an Arabic term. It is a synonym for destiny or fate. The term Kismet came to be used as an English word via the Turkish term ‘gismah’ which became ‘Kismet’ later implying Allah’s will in Islam, which people hold that it is a divine plan to have their lives guided by Kismet. On the contrary, Karma says that every person is responsible for her or his own fate depending on their actions. Therefore, the basic variation between kismet and karma is the later emphasizes that people can change their destiny through their day to day actions while the former holds that fate cannot be altered because it is pre-determined. Despite the fact that karma emphasizes on bad and good actions, it is often viewed as a positive term. It implies that human beings are created to perceive matters from a positive light and though they hear about karma, they fail to see things as they are. The term positive only becomes or remains positive where a negative exists. This means that a negative term may become positive as well. Most Muslims hold that Allah orders everything that happens in life. They believe that they are only destined for things that specifically happen in accordance with Allah’s wish.

What Allah Orders

It is a pure misconception that Allah decides two things only, birth and death, and that an individual decides on all other things according to his or her own free will. While Allah is knowledgeable about all that happens to people, according to karma, he does not decide their destiny but only shows them what path is right and which one is wrong. It is however upon people to decide what path to take depending on their free will.

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Posted by on Nov 17th, 2014 and filed under Humanities, Language, Religion. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.