Home » Language » What is Juju?

What is Juju?

What is Juju?
Juju is a West African term pertaining to some form of magical power coming from an object. It may also refer to the magical object itself which is venerated with so much superstition. This object is typically used as an amulet or a fetish by some tribes in the western African region. Some people refer to the term as some form of witchcraft performed by tribesmen in West Africa using charms, objects, or amulets that are believed to have various powers.

But beside’s juju’s use as some form of religious or superstitious object, it is also used as some form of protection from harm or evil. Since a “juju” object has magical powers, many people carry along different kinds of objects that are believed to ward off bad vibes and give security to the bearer. In another positive sense, Juju’s are also considered charms to bring good luck or good health to people. With this belief, the practice of keeping jujus has been passed on from generation to generation.

Juju is also associated with ritualistic activities that were hidden from the public eye. Veneration of objects and amulets is the main part of any ritual. These objects are considered sacred and powerful and are even said to contain evil spirits. This is the reason why some people also refer to “juju” as some form of banned ritual or activity. “Juju” also became synonymous with the word “taboo” as many people disapprove of the secretive nature of the rituals involving the concept of evil spirits on various objects. Some people also say that “juju” is similar to another traditional ritualistic activity called “voodoo”, which is also said to originate in West Africa.

The use or the practice of Juju has spread from West Africa to other countries in the world. In the US, it is said that the African slaves were the ones who brought the Juju practice in the country. As many of the slaves in the past wanted to preserve part of their beliefs and cultures, Juju is still being used or practiced today.

If you like this article or our site. Please spread the word. Share it with your friends/family.
Email This Post Email This Post Print This Post Print This Post

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

About This Post
Posted by Erwin Z on Jul 20th, 2011 and filed under Language. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response via following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site