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What is izzle?

Izzle is a suffix that is typically added to almost any word just to make sound different. Among the hip-hop community, various words are often converted into so-called slang terms and urban lingo. Famous rappers and hip-hop artists for example frequently use new slang terms in their music lyrics. One such slang terms is the suffix “izzle”. Using this term as suffix, the word “dog” for example may be converted to “dizzle”. The word “sure” becomes “shizzle” and same goes to a bunch of other words. In a given sentence, a person may not entirely understand the whole thought when all or most of the words are converted into slang terms and are added with the suffix izzle.

The popularity and use of izzle as a slang term or lingo is credited to hip-hop artist Snoop Dogg. Many other rap artists like Snoop Dogg also use a similar style of slang terms in their music lyrics. For the music insider and the fans of hip-hop culture, these new terms are often easily understood. The use of izzle and other slang terms may be a cool thing among the hip-hop community but other people may have a headache trying to figure out what one person is talking about. For many people who are not into using slang terms for example, they may not get the meaning of a sentence or comment when many of the words are added with the izzle suffix. In the sentence “Fo shizzle, he’s got the bizzle”, the basic translation is “For sure, he’s got the book”. When an otherwise naive or normal person is given this kind of remark, he may not understand the whole sentence because of the suffix added to the words in this particular example. The same is true when people chat in online forums and social media sites using slang terms like izzle. For non-hip-hop fans, sentences with izzle is simply too complicated to figure out.

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Posted by on Dec 24th, 2014 and filed under Language. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.