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What is folk music?

Folk music refers to music that is a representation of a particular community. Folk music is easy to sing and can be performed by any individual even if these individuals are not trained musicians using any instrument within their reach.

Folk music also has evolved over time. Some folk music was created during times when a community was in protest, but they are still being sung today.

Folk music explained

Folk music is commonly performed by communities and this means that this music was not created to cater to popular demand.

In recent years, some would refer to some music as “folky” music to describe songs or music that has developed with a specific sound or style. The term “folky” is often used to music or songs that make use of musical instruments that are uncommon or those that are not used in band or rock songs.

In the United States, it is common to use folk music in reference to songs or music that has the influence of the traditional American music. Songs from a mainstream band that uses non-common musical instruments may be referred to as folk music.

Those who sing folk songs are referred to as folk singers. These musicians and singers that create melody that usually does not cater to the popular taste are often referred to ask folk musicians. Many people consider folk musicians as experimentalists as they do not conform to the popular demand.

Some musicians who perform narrative songs using a myriad of instruments may also be referred to as folk musicians. The term folk music, after all has taken a different connotation or meaning for many people.

Some try to combine folk music and pop music in the hope of educating the younger generation of the music of local communities.

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Posted by on Nov 10th, 2014 and filed under Culture, Entertainment, Humanities. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.