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What is Cyanide?


Cyanide is a type of chemical that is form when carbon triple-bonds with nitrogen. Such combination can also be mixed up with other metals to form various compounds, such as sodium cyanide, potassium cyanide, and hydrogen cyanide.

Cyanide is often correlated to a deadly poison because it has been involved in fishing issues. In many countries and marginal fishing, fishermen use cyanide to kill fish and allow them to simply float above the water surface. Cyanide fishing is an easy way to catch fish but it has also been one of the notorious environmental issues. Fortunately, it has been already prohibited by law. During World War II, cyanide was also used to terminate a large group of Jewish captives. They were put in a close chamber and locked to breathe an air mixed with cyanide.

Cyanide is also found in some plants such as sugar canes, tobacco leaves, and large fruit pits. Although it is considered as poisonous, it also serves its own purpose. During film processing, cyanide salts are used to separate the gold from the ore. It is also use to create plastics and papers. The gas form of cyanide is used in cargo ships for fumigation. There are also some weird uses of cyanide such as in making suicide pills. Suicide pills are used by spies whenever they get caught up with their missions. The purpose is to prevent them from being exploited for secret information, which may contravene their supposed mission.

Any person may be exposed to cyanide by drinking water, breathing air, or touching a soul that is contaminated with cyanide. The most common symptoms of cyanide intoxication are dizziness, nausea, headache, rapid heart rate, and weakness. There are also persons who survive cyanide poisons but they are prone to developing long term health problems such as brain damage and heart disease.

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Posted by on Nov 17th, 2014 and filed under Chemistry, Science. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.