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What is CIFS?

What is CIFS?

“CIFS” stands for “Common Internet File System,” and it represents a protocol that allows remote access of various files over a computer network.  With the CIFS protocol in place, people can basically share the use of files and printers over the same network without necessarily having to install individual software for each element.  CIFS runs through an application layer type of network protocol, and some experts also refer to it as SMB, or Server Message Block.

The Common File Internet System predominantly runs on computers or networks that are under the Microsoft platform.  The best thing about this protocol is that literally all network users may share a particular file and view or edit it without having to open or launch a specific software or program.  Through the CIFS, productivity will be enhanced since all users and members of a particular computer network will be able to seamlessly share important documents and/or files.  The CIFS protocol also takes away the hassle of having to install printer software in every terminal in a given network.  This particular protocol allows the sharing of printing machines which further boosts productivity and efficiency in a given workplace.

In some networks, only Internet browsers may be available for viewing and/or accessing shared files and elements.  Although these Internet browsers may already serve an important purpose for most of an organization’s needs, there will always come a time that not all files can be opened or accessed from a specific terminal due to limitations in the system or program.  With CIFS, no such limitation exists, and files will be shared across networks with less hassles and no required software.  And the best thing about the CIFS framework is that any changes made on the server side are also automatically saved on the client side.  This simply means that the system itself provides data synchronization making it a good and efficient system to use by various computer networks.

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Posted by Erwin Z on Jan 14th, 2013 and filed under Protocols & Formats. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response via following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site