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What is Blyth?

What is Blyth?
Blyth is a term that may have different meanings to various people. For those living in the UK, Blyth is a small town in the northeastern part of England. It is a civil parish belonging to Northumberland with a population of only about 35,000. The name of the town is said to have come from the “River Blyth” which passes through this town and drains to the North Sea of England. This town is famous in England for its football club called the “Blyth Spartans”. This club is not a member of any league but had memorable matches at England’s FA Cup back in 1978. Today, this town is considered a “dormitory town” serving those that pass through it from Newcastle and North Tyneside.

In the urban lingo world, the word “blyth” also has two meanings. One definition for blyth refers to it as some sort of “drug den” or “drug spot” in the “top north east” area. It is also said that the “Blyth area” is known for growing nuclear chips. So when somebody talks about something that relates to a drug location, he/she may refer to the place as a “blyth area” or location.

Another meaning for the term “blyth” in internet slang is “some activist who happens to be young, charming, and sexy”. A blyth in this context is considered a very nice person that is able to win the hearts of the people around her. And winning over people and friends is not only because of her looks and charms, but blyths are also considered to have a good heart and working attitude. And when somebody talks about a blyth being a girlfriend for example, part of her characteristics is that she’s also passionate and considered an asset in the bedroom. In simple terms, a blyth is considered the perfect friend, colleague, activist, or lover.

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Posted by Erwin Z on Jul 28th, 2011 and filed under Language. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response via following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site