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What is Blanching?


Blanching refers to a cooking technique that involves food into hot, boiling water for one to two minutes. The process involves two steps. The first step involves putting the food in the boiling water and the next step involves putting the food in ice water to stop the process of cooling fast. There are many reasons for blanching food. These include loosening the thin skin on vegetables and fruits, to fix and brighten color or to give the food a texture that feels crisp-tender. Blanching may also be done to prepare vegetables and fruits for pro-longed storage in the freezer. There are some recipes that require for blanching of vegetables and fruits as well. Blanching aids in loosening the skill so that it is easy to peel vegetables or fruits such as tomatoes and peaches. It also gets the foods cooked partially prior to adding them to a dish and prevents vegetables from turning grayish. It also removes bitterness from some vegetables such as kale and dandelion greens.

The Blanching Process

When blanching your foods, first prepare the ice bath. This involves putting ice and water in a clean sink or a big bowl. Heat water in a large pot; consider using a gallon for each pound of food you want to blanch. Add salt to the hot water, make it extremely salty. This makes the water coming into contact with the food more denser helping prevent nutrients from leaking into the water. Put the food you want to blanch inside the boiling water and leave them in there for a minute of two. Take the food out of the boiling water and dip it into the ice water. This helps them cool off pretty fast. Once they have cooled off, remove the food from the ice water and pat them dry.

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Posted by on Oct 17th, 2014 and filed under Food. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.