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What is a Regulated Power Supply?

What is a Regulated Power Supply?
Power supplies are devices that are made to give out electrical energy to the electric load terminal. This particular terminal plays a key role in producing output voltage and/or current in an electric circuit. The main function of a power supply involves the production of electrical energy and/or conversion of the same energy to another form. If the output current or voltage supplied by a power supply unit or device is controlled, then it is referred to as a “regulated power supply or device”.

All power supply devices only function to provide electrical energy to the endpoint or electrical load. And in order to perform this task, the device itself needs an energy source. The energy source may be from fuel cells, batteries, and other energy saving/storage units, from power-generating systems like alternators and generators, from electrical energy transmission systems, and even from the sun.

For regulated power supply types, electric energy may also come from different sources. It could also be set up as a stand-alone device or maybe integrated within an existing electrical circuit. It still functions like a regular power supply but its main duty is to control voltage or current to specific and stable values depending on the specifications of the circuit. It may also be configured in such a way that the output voltage or current falls within a specific range with a maximum or minimum limit set. And it can also function to make output compensations to adjust to possible inconsistencies and variations in the source of the electrical supply.

Basic uses for regulated power supplies include the power adaptors for cellular phones, home appliances, and bench type (DC variable) of power supply devices. And as with other devices, all power supply devices will also have their limits in terms of the amount of output voltage or current it can supply and the time in which it can perform its intended function.

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Posted by Erwin Z on Jul 6th, 2011 and filed under Electrical. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response via following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site